Research

Air pollution in the megacities of Asia (APMA)

APMA built upon the efforts of UNEP/WHO to improve air pollution policies with the use of scientific data gained from monitoring and assessment.

More than half of the world’s population live in urban areas in Asia. Urban air pollution in most Asian megacities (with a population of more than ten million) such as Beijing, Delhi and Jakarta has worsened due to the cumulative effects of population growth, industrialisation and increased vehicle use.

The health consequences of exposure to polluted air are considerable - approximately 20-30 per cent of all respiratory diseases appear to be caused by air pollution.

About APMA
In 2000 the Korea Environment Institute, United Nations Environment Programme, World Health Organization and SEI initiated the Air Pollution in the Megacities of Asia (APMA) project.

APMA focused on the development of policy to address urban air pollution in Asian megacities. It aimed to increase the capacity of governments and city authorities to deal with urban air pollution issues by developing a regional policy framework and collating information on best practice on AQM.

SEI, together with other stakeholders, developed a Strategic Framework for Air Quality Management in Asia and initiated a Benchmarking study of AQM in twenty Asian cities.
Strategic approach to AQM

The Strategic Framework aims to:
- guide decision-makers and stakeholders in Asia in the formulation and implementation of AQM strategies and programmes
- provide a broad, high-level approach that is flexible and adaptable to the needs of different countries and cities
- highlight the most important components of a comprehensive AQM system in a rational and systematic manner

The Framework is divided into five sections that cover AQM’s key components:
- Air quality policies & governance
- Sources of emissions
- Air quality monitoring & modelling
- Health, environmental and economic risk assessments
- Financing of AQM

External Web Site:
http://sei-international.org/rapidc/

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