People


Marcus Carson

marcus.carson@sei-international.org

Mobile: +46 73 460 4845

Title: Senior Research Fellow

Expertise: paradigmatic beliefs, institutional arrangements, and organizational networks

Centre: Stockholm

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    Marcus Carson is a Senior Research Fellow at SEI Stockholm.

    Marcus's research focuses on social change processes, with an emphasis on the social/political drivers and obstacles involved in developing policy responses to climate change. Key theoretical elements in his work include the roles of paradigmatic beliefs, institutional arrangements, and organizational networks in influencing policymaking and social change processes.

    Over the past few years, he has focused on better understanding the nature of the drivers and obstacles that influence climate and energy policies in the US, Sweden, and in the European Union. With much of the important progress in reducing greenhouse gas emissions currently being organized at the local scale where people live, work, consume and engage, Marcus is increasingly interested in efforts to bridge the "implementation gap"

    His work has been supported by research funding from the Swedish Research Council, (Vetenskapsrådet), Sweden’s Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (Formas), Mistra’s Climate Policy Research Program (Clipore), European Union framework programs, and the European Environment Agency, among others.

    Marcus brings a diverse background to his work, including hands-on experience with community organizing, policy analysis, political and labor organization, and work as a professional musician. Prior to coming to Sweden with his family, Marcus was involved for nearly 2 decades in social change and policy advocacy at the national, state and local level in the US. He received his PhD in Sociology in 2004 from Stockholm University, where he also earned his Associate Professorship in 2009.



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